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1/8/2013 3:59:25   
Arthur
How We Roll Winner
Dec14


Hey there fellow L&L Writers, Readers and Critiques,

As I was re-reading Lord of The Rings yesterday, a thought suddenly struck my mind and I decided to make this thread.

Over the course of their journeys, your characters must have mastered some eldritch tongue or the other, whether it be reading, writing or speaking.

Did you know that the Fairforth Giants talk to each other by picking up two rocks and knocking them against each other repeatedly in unique patterns?

The whistling of the wind that a Hunter hears in the Eastern Heartforest at midnight is actually the mating call made by Wood Sirens.

So what languages and written scripts do your creatures and characters use in your stories?


< Message edited by Arthur -- 1/8/2013 4:00:14 >
DF MQ AQW  Post #: 1
1/8/2013 6:01:07   
lordkaho
Creative!


Interesting topic there Arthur. (wait, you changed your name??)

I don't really tend to use made-up languages in my settings, but instead borrow from already existing languages in real life. Because, the rule "As long as it sounds foreign/exotic, it's cool" heavily applies in my works. Which is why you'll often see broken German, Russian, Hindu, Latin and in some cases Japanese terms in my stories. I absolutely love to use the German language in particular. It's the friggin' language of dragons. The name Black Forest already sounds pretty edgy. How do you make it even more awesome? Call it Schwarzwald.

Though I've done my share of some Lovecraft-inspired terms. Those tongue twisting syllables and random inserting of apostrophes get really fun.

< Message edited by lordkaho -- 1/8/2013 6:02:15 >
DF MQ  Post #: 2
1/8/2013 9:27:11   
Glais
Member

I've never put that much into anything I've written either.
Having enough trouble with a basics heh.

Though I suppose an honorable mention could go to a character planned who talks to the wind.
The song reference wasn't even intentional at first
DF MQ  Post #: 3
1/8/2013 11:05:41   
Arthur
How We Roll Winner
Dec14


I didn't change my name, only shortened it. Arthur Dragonlord seemed somewhat cumbersome.

Anyways, over the years, I've come to like written script and loved to decipher the strange written languages, like Elvish, Dwarvish etc. It always bore an element of mystery for me.

I can't say much for myself but my elder brother(who is also a better writer than me in terms of vocabulary, not story content) created a complete script of what he called a new language. It bore some resemblance to the Quenya script and was interesting to read.

As for the languages used in modern world, I most frequently make use of Japanese... and Hindi to some extent too since I am a Hindu myself. For example, if you remember Alverlance, it had the Danavas in it, now Danava stands for Demon. Similarly, Daitya is another variation, but it stands for Big/Muscular/Hulking Demon/Monster. Other variations are Rakshasa, Nishachar(Nisha is Night, Char[pronounced as Chur] is to Eat/Feed. So Eaters of the Night) Bhoot stands for Ghost.

Seriously, I am a walking Hindi dictionary if you need one.^^
DF MQ AQW  Post #: 4
1/8/2013 13:02:18   
  Dwelling Dragonlord

ArchKnight AQ / OOC / L&L


I refrain from the use of other languages, opting clarity over coolness.

I do use some draconic and various dialects of common in my story.
AQ DF AQW  Post #: 5
1/8/2013 13:51:07   
Eukara Vox
Legendary AdventureGuide!


I don't usually use other languages. But, I do have one novel where a few of the characters use an old, really old language from history. It causes issues in the present in the book. And is is also based off of Old Egyptian. Since I have a book that teaches the reading and pronunciation of ancient Egyptian, I have used the transliteration method and used that as my language.

Otherwise, aside from telepathic Dragon to Bonded, which really isn't a "language", I stick with English.

When it comes to naming people, towns, things, etc I do tend to use Finnish, Norwegian, Icelandic and Dutch, because for some reason so many things sound beautiful in those tongues.
AQ DF MQ AQW Epic  Post #: 6
1/8/2013 14:02:31   
Arthur
How We Roll Winner
Dec14


It's not that I use written, scripted languages in my story all that much frequently. It's just that the possibility is unique.

While some tend to completely organize their self-made languages by making alphabets, articles, words etc, I tend to make just mere mentions of the languages like a stray word included here or there, or a stray command.

But for the most part, I stick to the display of visual languages or strange languages that mix with natural phenomena and are mistaken for them as I've shown in this thread's opening post.


< Message edited by Arthur -- 1/8/2013 14:03:48 >
DF MQ AQW  Post #: 7
1/8/2013 15:48:23   
Hopeful Guy

Hope Upbringer! (DragonFable)


I generally use English, but I might try using a few other languages. (Also, someone else who speaks Hindi. O_o) A language based off real languages with words modified shouldn't be too hard to make up.
DF  Post #: 8
1/8/2013 17:30:35   
Shadow Ravena
Paladin of Shadows


As I am not the best at languages, I stick with English for the text. However, for names of people/places/etc, I will usually use other languages (Latin, Greek, German, etc) for them to add a bonus for anyone who can figure it out. Ex: in one story the last name of two characters named Raven and Royal is German for Raven Royal. Sometimes its the only way the name makes any sense at all (ei if its a villain name).

If I would use any language for text though, then it would be Latin, due to the fact you can semi-decipher it without knowing the language.
AQ DF AQW Epic  Post #: 9
1/8/2013 19:24:43   
lordkaho
Creative!


quote:

I didn't change my name, only shortened it. Arthur Dragonlord seemed somewhat cumbersome.


It seems Glaisaurus has done the same as well.

quote:

I am a walking Hindi dictionary if you need one.^^


Then I guess, we'd be talking a lot now Arthur.

As for visual languages that are often mistaken for trivial things, I'm afraid I rarely employ this. Since I'm not much of a writer in the High Fantasy genre, I don't explore much the eccentricities or the 'cultures' of the strange creatures in my stories. It's an animalistic/natural behaviour that I just feel clashes with the mood of how I write my setting.

DD, on the other hand, has used this to really good effect in his own story.
DF MQ  Post #: 10
1/8/2013 22:19:31   
Glais
Member

quote:

When it comes to naming people, towns, things, etc I do tend to use Finnish, Norwegian, Icelandic and Dutch, because for some reason so many things sound beautiful in those tongues.

On that note, I tend to use Italian names, generally food.
Not that I'm an expert, but I try.

And yeah "glaisaurus_x" is...pretty stupid, and everyone shortens it anyways so I finally decided to change it.
DF MQ  Post #: 11
1/22/2013 14:57:53   
Chaosweaver Amon
Friendly!


I just use a sort of mix of Latin, Greek, and a bit of just other ways to speak while still sounding like a proper language, it sort of developes itself. Like for my story in the AE fanfiction, I have been working on some type of old Draconic. I even practise speaking in it, to get the feel of it. Sometimes, all you have to do is rearrange certain syllables to make a word completely different. Very interesting topic...
AQ DF AQW  Post #: 12
1/22/2013 15:21:08   
Legendium
Member

quote:

I absolutely love to use the German language in particular. It's the friggin' language of dragons. The name Black Forest already sounds pretty edgy. How do you make it even more awesome? Call it Schwarzwald.


Alter, warum sagst du es hort sich wie Drachen an? Find ich nicht. Es ist mehr wie Steine. Jedes Wort is so artikuliert dass es sich 3D fuhlt. Aber Deutsch is denoch 'ne tolle Sprache. Besonders wenn man dass Umgangsprache kennt. (Dude, why do you think it sounds like dragons? I don't think it does. It's more like the language of stones. Every word is articulated so harshly that they feel almost 3D. But German's a great language. Especially when you know the normally spoken language, as opposed to the written, textbook language.)

Technically, Schwarzwald is just a name. If you really wanted to describe a forest as "Black", you'd have to say "Schwarzes Wald". ;)

I don't tend to use other languages much when writing, although it's incredibly useful for making names. Making up languages is never something I've delved far into, because I find it hard to recreate grammar in ways no longer used. I usually resort to a few different words with English or German grammar.

< Message edited by Legendium -- 1/22/2013 15:23:07 >
DF MQ Epic  Post #: 13
1/23/2013 0:44:06   
Eukara Vox
Legendary AdventureGuide!


quote:

Dude, why do you think it sounds like dragons? I don't think it does. It's more like the language of stones. Every word is articulated so harshly that they feel almost 3D.


That is the most epic way to describe German. Though, my high school librarian could speak 5 languages, one of which was German, and she made it sound musical. She could also speak French and make it sound like you were throwing up. The woman was amazing. She said you can make any language a language of love and any language a language of grinding stones. It was all in presentation.

I've tried to create a language. Man, that is a lot of work.

Like I've said many places, I am in love with the sounds of languages. Some, more than others. I think if I ever make it to Finland, Norway, Germany, Netherlands or Iceland, I will just sit in the middle of a town (preferably a small one) and just spend the day listening. Then, I would get to hear the languages I use in person!

One can dream...
AQ DF MQ AQW Epic  Post #: 14
1/23/2013 1:29:22   
Arthur
How We Roll Winner
Dec14


I prefer to go for Japanese as my alternate language in stories. Probably because I grew up watching Anime and I'll say that Japanese can be described in many words. For one, it's vibrant. It's very "colorful" to listen to. Secondly, it's versatile. It twists in ways unimaginable. Thirdly, Japanese names carry an element of simplicity, yet they are in a way, very... powerful, in a manner of speaking. For example,

Hei
Ren
Jin
Rika
Kaito
etc.

So there.

I tend to stay away from using my own national tongue Hindi mainly because most names are combination of two words. For example,

Ganesh- Gana+Ish, Gana meaning people/subjects and Ish(Short form for "Ishwar") meaning God/Father/Caretaker. So Ganesh is Father/God of People. It's heavily context sensitive.

Ganesh is actually the name of a God in Hindu mythology. He's the god with a child's body and an elephant's head. Although, you'll find Hindi being used frequently in most media. Examples are Asura(Demon), Vajra(A godly weapon that resembles a Chakram), Neela Paani(Yes, the one in DF, meaning Blue Water)
DF MQ AQW  Post #: 15
1/23/2013 8:02:56   
Legendium
Member

quote:

I think if I ever make it to Finland, Norway, Germany, Netherlands or Iceland, I will just sit in the middle of a town (preferably a small one) and just spend the day listening. Then, I would get to hear the languages I use in person!


I might as well say this now. Languages learned in books are almost nothing like the language spoken in the streets. The classical "Goethe" German is nothing like Umgangsprache (Direct Translation: Going-around speak). Plus, if you pick any small city in southern Germany, you will very likely hear no German at all. In those small cities, they all speak the dialect "Schwäbisch".

Although I see you're point. Most of the time I tend to be living in the country where I speak their language, so I care less about how the language sounds, rather, what you can tell about their culture and typical mannerisms through their speech. Take the word Umgangsprache for instance. It's really two words put together. Germans tend to be that way as well, preferring to slam two words together so that it's practical rather than the fancy sounding french.

But I think we're getting a bit off-topic. While it's great to talk about real languages, the main topic is things like fantasy, self-made languages.
DF MQ Epic  Post #: 16
1/23/2013 17:20:28   
lordkaho
Creative!


quote:

Ganesh- Gana+Ish, Gana meaning people/subjects and Ish(Short form for "Ishwar") meaning God/Father/Caretaker. So Ganesh is Father/God of People. It's heavily context sensitive


And this is why I love Hindi so much. Man, you guys and your awesome 'transcended above form' sounding names.

Why create a language when you already have an awesome one existing right now?
DF MQ  Post #: 17
9/9/2014 15:50:02   
Crystal Sunshyne
Member
 

Oooooh may I please answer this? Even though the conversation is from more than a year and a half ago and I have to leave out at least 99% of what I want to say on the subject because I’m afraid of boring you?

One of my first thoughts as soon as I start worldbuilding a new place is always “How many languages do I get to invent for this?” because however fascinating the history, politics, and geography may be, language is always my favourite aspect of a culture. I usually try to create languages with plausible structures based on common (or extremely uncommon or nonexistent but theoretically possible in an alternate reality) features of natural human languages, but I do like the idea of other kinds of communication as well, like hearing the voices of trees in the sound of leaves rustling in the wind. I also enjoy designing artistic and impractical writing systems, such as Tree Script, in which sentences are drawn in the shapes of deciduous trees.

quote:

Why create a language when you already have an awesome one existing right now?


Why create a world when you already have a pretty awesome one to live in? Why do we write and read fiction? I think there is an insatiable collective curiosity that drives people to invent and experience new things, and since only a fraction of all that could hypothetically exist actually does occur in our reality many of the possibilities we explore can only be accessed in the realm of imagination.
Post #: 18
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